Garden of medicinal plants

Photos Credit: Salagon Museum

Translator: Jean-Marc Bulit

Common mallow

Malva sylvestris or the common mallow is a plant with a hairy stem and mauve flowers, that blooms between june and august around villages and land rich in nitrates. The Romans would eat its young sprouts: Cicero who loved it got an indigestion from it and Pline used its juice against feeling faint. Platearius recommended to bite down on clary sage roots in case of a toothache and to oint oneself with clary sage sap mixed with olive oil against bee bites.

Clary sage has laxative qualities (young sprouts in salad) and calms inflammations in the mouth. It is also used in case of coughing or bronchitis.

Common vervain - Oldcook : medicinal garden with photos of Salagon Museum Rosemary de from Drôme, photo J.Bouchut - Oldcook : medicinal garden Pot marigold from Drôme, photo J.Bouchut - Oldcook : medicinal garden Saint John's wort - Oldcook : medicinal garden with photos of Salagon Museum Common mallow - Oldcook : medicinal garden with photos of Salagon Museum Clary sage - Oldcook : medicinal garden with photos of Salagon Museum

Click on the photo to access the garden's plant.

Jardin médiéval imaginaire